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I am hoping to get back into a better rhythm with posting recipes here again. I have tried a few new recipes the last few months and need to get them added. A friend of mine posted on her blog a few weeks back that she was starting to make homemade sandwich bread. I have thought of doing this myself but my homemade bread never seems like it would work very well for sandwiches. My friend posted this recipe the other day and I had to try it! It turned out okay and tasted great but I was still concerned it would crumble as a sandwich. So I started googling, got to love Chef Google :p .  I was looking for a whole wheat recipe because it is healthier and my husband likes wheat bread. I tend to not like it because its drier. I found out that wheat bread tends to need a little less flour when mixing and so I found a recipe for a white bread and decided to create a whole wheat bread. I am very happy with my results I must say. I will warn that this recipe may need more tweaking and I will come back and edit it if need be. I did not take many pictures because I did not expect it to turn out so well the first try to be honest. Any ways here it is.

Source: Adapted from here (www.browneyedbaker.com)

Prep time: 15 minutes Rise Time: 2hrs Cook Time:30-40 minutes

  • 6 1/2 cups whole wheat flour(your going to need more will explain below)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 cups warm whole milk(about 110 degrees)
  • 2/3 cup warm water(about 110 degrees)
  • 4 tbsp butter, melted
  • 6 tbsp honey
  • 2 envelopes(about 4 1/2 tsp) instant yeast

Mix 6 1/2 cups of the flour and the salt in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with a dough hook. Mix the milk, water, butter, honey, and yeast in a small bowl. Turn the machine to low and slowly add the liquid. When the dough comes together, increase the speed to medium and mix until the dough is smooth and satiny, stopping the machine two or three times to scrape dough from hook, if necessary, about 10 minutes. (After 5 minutes of kneading, if the dough is still sticking to the sides of the bowl, add flour, 1 tablespoon at a time*read note below*, until the dough is no longer sticky.) Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface; knead to form as mooth, round ball, about 15 seconds.

Place the dough in a very lightly oiled large bowl, rubbing the dough around the bowl to coat lightly. Cover the bowl with a towel and place on a heated heating pad for 40-50 minutes or until the dough doubles in size.

Cut the dough in half. With each half gently press the dough into a rectangle 1 inch thick and no longer than 9 inches. WIth a long side facing you, roll the dough firmly into a cylinder, pressing with your fingers to make sure the dough sticks to itself. Turn the dough seam-side up and pinch it closed. Place the dough seam-side down in a greased 9 by 5-inch loaf pan and press it gently so it touches all four sides of the pan. Cover with a towel and return to the heated heating pad till the dough almost doubles in size, 20 to 30 minutes.

Keep one oven rack at the lowest position and place the other at the middle position and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Place an empty baking pan on the bottom rack. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a small saucepan. Pour the boiling water into the empty pan on the bottom rack and set the loaf pans onto the middle rack. Bake for about 35 to 45 minutes. Remove bread from oven and let cool in pans for 5 minutes Remove the bread from the pans, transfer to a wire rack, and cool to room temperature. Slice and serve.

Yields: 2 loafs

*I don’t know the exact amount of flour I used. I started out with 6 cups and added 1 tablespoon at a time. I am sure I added at least a extra 1/2 cup. You can always add flour so it better to start with less and work your way up.

This recipe turned out so well. I could not believe how moist this bread was. You can taste the honey and if your not a honey fan you could try using regular sugar I bet. It was also very easy to slice and I can easily see this working well for sandwiches or toast. I sliced the 2nd loaf and put it in the freezer for later. When storing home made bread it seems freezing is the best way to go. It is also better to put it in a zip lock bag and let it sit on the counter rather then putting it in the refrigerator. If you don’t eat a lot of bread you could freeze it then take out slices and pop them in the toaster to unthaw. When properly packaged bread can be frozen for 3-4 months.

I will say again this recipe is still a work in progress but it turned out quite well and I wanted to share it. Happy Baking!

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